ISSN 1301-143X | E-ISSN 1309-1484
Original Article
Evaluation of Tularemia Cases in Samsun Province Between 2011 and 2018
1 Samsun Eğitim ve Araştırma Hastanesi, İnfeksiyon Hastalıkları ve Klinik Mikrobiyoloji Kliniği, Samsun, Türkiye  
Klimik Dergisi 2019; 32: 62-66
DOI: 10.5152/kd.2019.14
Key Words: Disease outbreaks, tularemia, Samsun.
Abstract

 

Objective: Tularemia is a zoonotic disease that can cause outbreaks. In our study, we aimed to examine the tularemia cases that were detected between 2011 and 2018.

 

Methods: In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the data of 16 patients admitted to Samsun Training and Research Hospital Outpatient Clinic of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology between January 2011 and April 2018, and diagnosed as tularemia clinically and with serological findings.

 

Results: The mean age of the cases was 47.5 (age range 17-74), 4 (25%) were male and 12 (75%) were female. One case was identified each year in 2012, 2014 and 2016, but 13 cases were detected in 2017. When the residence places of the cases in 2017 were considered, 10 cases were from Samsun’s Kavak sub-province, 3 cases from Havza sub-province, 2 cases from Salıpazarı sub-province and 1 case from Vezirköprü sub-province. The number of cases in Kavak province hit the top and ended early in February and March 2017. The most common form was oropharyngeal tularemia (62.5%). All tularemia cases were treated with streptomycin for 14 days.

 

Conclusions: Tularemia which causes epidemics in the Central Black Sea region, including Samsun, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with fever and cervical lymphadenopathy. Klimik Dergisi 2019; 32(1): 62-6.

 

Cite this article as: Alkan-Çeviker S, Günal Ö, Kılıç SS. [Evaluation of tularemia cases in Samsun province between 2011 and 2018]. Klimik Derg. 2019; 32(1): 62-6. Turkish.

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